Staining vs Painting Your Home And Why It Is Important

The Choice You Make Will Have An Impact On Your Home In Prescott
After staining a wood home

Staining vs painting your home will not only decide how it looks but how often you will need to repaint it. There are a couple of options.

Find out how long they all last below-

What’s The Difference?

“Should we stain or paint our home exterior?” David asks Stephanie.

“Umm, I’m not sure, stained?” Stephanie replies. “What do you think?” David rubs his chin thoughtfully. “I’m not too sure, either.”

“Well, besides what’s being used, what are the differences in staining vs painting?” asks Stephanie. David shrugs. “I don’t know. Let’s look it up on Google and see what we can find.” He gets out his phone and starts typing.

“Aha! I found something on staining vs painting. Here, take a look.” Here is what he and Stephanie see:

Staining vs Painting

With staining vs painting a home, it’s about the look and durability. Stains can be semi-transparent or solid. The difference is how much of the natural wood look you see. They only last about 2 to 3 and 6 to 8 years, respectively. Paint usually lasts 6 to 10 years.

Paint on a home that makes it look like a wood finish

Staining Your Home

Stains are meant to show off the texture and/or grain of your wood siding.

Jimmy Cordier, the owner of Pinon Painting, talks some about wood and natural finishes in the video below:

You can see a lot more of the texture and grain with semi-transparent stains. It preserves a lot more of the natural wood look. While it does look great it also needs the most maintenance. You’ll be restaining about every 2 to 3 years. It could be less if you’re in a super sunny area.

Solid stains are darker, hiding the grain. It looks like paint but it shows a bit more of the wood than paint does. This type of stain lasts about 6 to 8 years.

Painting Your Home

Paints come in all sorts of colors, so your house can look just about however you want it to. A good prime and paint job can last anywhere from 6 to 10 years. You can match the paint close enough to a stain that your home still has the wood look to it.

You May Also Like To Read

“So, now the question is, do you want a more natural look or one that’ll last longer?” asks David. Stephanie shrugs. “Why don’t we do a little more digging before we decide?”